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dynamicafrica:

What you need to know about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

The Ebola virus has been detected in several West African countries. Here’s what you need to know about Ebola and what’s going on (so far):

The back story on this particular outbreak of Ebola in West Africa:

It began early this year in the forested villages of southeast Guinea.

For months, the infected went undiagnosed. It wasn’t until March 23 that the news finally hit the World Health Organization. And by then, Ebola had already claimed 29 lives, the organization reported in a one-paragraph press release.

Since then, the organization has dispatched nine additional updates on a ballooning outbreak that’s received modest notice in the West, but has sent waves of panic across the African continent.

What exactly is Ebola?

Ebola is one of the deadliest virus diseases in humans. Known formally as the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) or Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever (EHF), it is caused by any one of the five known Ebola virus species:

  • Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BDBV)
  • Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV)
  • Reston ebolavirus (RESTV)
  • Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV)
  • Taï Forest ebolavirus (TAFV).

What’s the history of this virus?

Ebola first appeared in 1976 in 2 simultaneous outbreaks, in Nzara, Sudan, and in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter was in a village situated near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name.

Here’s another infographic about Ebola’s history.

How does one get Ebola?

The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission. Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are considered to be the natural host of the Ebola virus. Consumption of a contaminated animal, close contact with an infected animal or it’s blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids can also lead to infection.

Once a human being is infected and comes in to contact with others, the disease continues to spread.

EVD outbreaks occur primarily in remote villages in Central and West Africa, near tropical rainforests.

What happens when you get Ebola?

EVD is a severe acute viral illness often characterized by the sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and sore throat. This is followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding. Laboratory findings include low white blood cell and platelet counts and elevated liver enzymes.

People are infectious as long as their blood and secretions contain the virus. Ebola virus was isolated from semen 61 days after onset of illness in a man who was infected in a laboratory.

The incubation period, that is, the time interval from infection with the virus to onset of symptoms, is 2 to 21 days.

Which countries has the outbreak occurred in?

Guinea and Liberia have both confirmed multiple cases of Ebola. Ghannareported tests on a suspected case were negative. The WHO says Sierra Leone has ruled out Ebola in its two suspected cases, and two of Mali’s six suspected cases have been cleared. Nigeria’s Minister of Information confirmed there was no outbreak of Ebola earlier this month.

How many people have died so far in this particular outbreak?

As of April 8th, 2014, 98 people in Guinea and 10 in Liberia have all been confirmed dead as a result of Ebola.

Is there a cure for Ebola?

EVD outbreaks have a case fatality rate of up to 90%. So far, there is no specific treatment or vaccine is available for use in people or animals.

What about treatment?

No specific treatment is available. New drug therapies are being evaluated. No vaccine for EVD is available. Several vaccines are being tested, but none are available for clinical use.

Connect with Dynamic Africa on:

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All Africa, All the time.

ETA: I’m not a medical doctor or health practitioner so feel free to rectify anything you see here that’s incorrect.

(top image via usatoday)

(via thescienceofreality)

clanstoneheart asked: What products/paint do you use for your grey orc kit?

http://www.mehron.com/StarBlend_Cake_Makeup_p/110.htm

and

http://www.mehron.com/Barrier_Spray_p/145.htm

I just started using it over the winter and I’ve been very happy with it so far. It will be interesting to see how well it holds up to a summer battle’s heavy sweating, though. Can’t be worse than the cream-based makeup I used to use. That stuff is garbage.

Dagorhir’s Mittelmarch Olympics

This is the first heavy fighting I’ve done with my tusks in. So far, so good. They stayed in place and didn’t break.

skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.

(via thescienceofreality)

2 days ago 7885 notes

Tagged with:  #Science

ilovecharts:

The Hierarchy of Camping
via canarykara 

I’m trying to work my way from tier 5 to tier 6.

ilovecharts:

The Hierarchy of Camping

via  

I’m trying to work my way from tier 5 to tier 6.

(via horpledorp)

Tagged with:  #camping  #it's intents
asapscience:

A simple guide to genetic mutations. via Neurons want food

asapscience:

A simple guide to genetic mutations. 
via Neurons want food

(via sagansense)

Tagged with:  #Science  #Genetics

calleo:

highenergyjewtrino:

A friend linked me these because he thought they’d be relevant to me, he was extremely correct.  If these pieces of advice aren’t relevant to you, improve yourself until they are.

[source]

A good chunk of Tumblr could benefit from this.

Thanks, T.R.

(via aeonbaby)

swoz:

preteenager:

moistchunkyslurp:

URGENT MESSAGE: Watch this. 

so THIS is that swimming anime thing everyone was talking about in 2012

have I made my point yet?

It gets better every time you watch it.